?

Log in

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Starman Jones

David Bowie's birthday was yesterday.I read that his musical career spans 47 years, nearly as long as I've been alive.  As with many musicians, I have some good memories of Bowie's music as part of the warp and weft of my own life. My favorite time coincides with the first time I heard Bowie.  I was 17 and driving home to my parent's house late at night after a long weekend shift at the Chinese restaurant. It was early spring in Indiana and one of those still, moonless nights with the smell of pig manure coming through the open windows as I drove past farmland just outside of town.  I drove a Triumph Herald then. I loved that little car. I was listening to WWKI, Rock 93 out of Kokomo.  A friend of a friend was a DJ there, Chip Longshore.  He had just started working at the station so naturally they gave him the graveyard shift. It was alright because it meant he could play most anything he wanted without the program manager freaking out about the playlist.

As I came into town, taking my usual swing past my girlfriend's house to honk my horn at her, this song came on the radio.  I had heard nothing like it before.  Part folk, part rock with this weird little story about a space man coming down to see us sung by a guy with a voice vaguely like Anthony Newley.  I liked it immediately.  The song reminded me of the Heinlein story Starman Jones. I was crossing the Wildcat Creek Bridge a block from my house and I slowed way down to hear if Chip would I.D. the song....."That was David Bowie with Starman from the album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, one of last year's top ten albums in my opinion. Next up! Thin Lizzy!"... I crept into the darkened house and put up my keys and coat. I called my girl Susan.
"Hey!"
"Hey!"
"I just heard this great song."

Comments

( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
dabroots
Jan. 9th, 2013 02:45 pm (UTC)
That's a great story, and that song is one of the best to hear unexpectedly while driving on a beautiful night in the mid-twentieth century Midwest.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )